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Sample map: Australian Curriculum – The Arts: Dance

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Foundation to Year 2

Level description

In Foundation to Year 2, students explore dance. They learn about how dance can represent the world and they make dances to represent their ideas about the world. They share their dance with peers and experience dance as audiences.

In Foundation to Year 2, learning in Dance builds upon the Early Years Learning Framework. Students are engaged through purposeful play in structured activities, fostering a strong sense of wellbeing and developing students' connection with and contribution to the world.

Students become aware of their bodies and learn about the body bases, parts and zones used in dance. They explore space, time, dynamics and relationships as they make and observe dances. They explore locomotor and non-locomotor movements and use these fundamental movement skills in their own dance. They experiment with simple technical and expressive skills and begin to learn about choreographic devices through selecting and organising movements in their own dances.

In the Foundation Year, students undertake dance suitable to their level of development.

As they experience dance, students draw on dances from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the dances and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. While dance in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, students are also aware of and interested in dance from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students will learn that dances are used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for different purposes.

As they make and respond to dance, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social and cultural contexts of dance. They make simple evaluations of dance expressing what they like and why. Students learn about safe dance practices. They experience the role of artist and they respond to feedback in their dance making. As an audience they learn to focus their attention on the performance and to respond at the end of the performance.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore, improvise and organise ideas to make dance sequences using the elements of dance (ACADAM001)

  • Considering viewpoints – forms and elements: For example – Which levels are you using in your dance? What sort of movements did the dancers perform? What are they wearing? What kind of music are they dancing to?

Present dance that communicate ideas to an audience, including dance used by cultural groups in the community (ACADAM003)

  • Considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – What did this dance make you think about? Did the dance movements remind you of anything? How are you communicating the ideas or intention in this dance?

Respond to dance and consider where and why people dance, starting with dances from Australia including dances of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADAR004)

  • identifying where they might experience dance in their lives and communities, for example, considering how dance sustains and communicates cultural knowledge
  • Considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – Why are these people dancing? Where are they dancing? Where is this dance from?
  • recognising that dance can show that people have different feelings about the world based on their experiences of the environment and other people
  • Considering viewpoints – What sort of movements did the dancers perform? What are they wearing? What kind of music are they dancing to?

Years 3 and 4

Level description

In Years 3 and 4, learning in Dance builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to dance independently and collaboratively with their classmates and teachers.

Students extend their awareness of the body as they incorporate actions using different body parts, body zones and bases. They explore and experiment with directions, time, dynamics and relationships using groupings, objects and props. They extend their fundamental movement skills adding and combining more complex movements. Students use technical skills including accuracy and awareness of body alignment and expressive skills including projection and focus.

As they experience dance, students draw on dances from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the dance and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn about dance in their community. They also learn about dance from more distant locations that may be represented in their community. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dances use expressive skills to communicate ideas and tell stories.

As they make and respond to dance, students explore meaning and interpretation, elements and forms including shapes and sequences of dances, and social and cultural contexts of dance. They make personal evaluations of dances.

Students learn about warm-up and cool down for safe dance practice and careful selection of dress and footwear. Their understanding of the role of the artist and the audience builds upon their experience from the previous band. As an audience, students focus their attention on the performance and respond to the performance. They consider why and how audiences respond to performance. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Improvise and structure movement ideas for dance sequences using the elements of dance and choreographic devices (ACADAM005)

  • selecting and combining movements using choreographic devices such as contrast and repetition, for example, combining movements learned in a dance from Asia with other dance movements, or repeating movement to show emphasis

Perform dances using expressive skills to communicate ideas, including telling cultural or community stories (ACADAM007)

  • using expressive skills of projection and focus to communicate dance ideas to an audience (school assembly, community festival, etc.); for example, looking out and up to the ceiling and extending movements outwards to express a feeling of joy
  • exploring the elements of dance to communicate ideas clearly, such as telling cultural stories in a dance with or without music; for example, travelling lightly using hands and feet to represent a bilby, or skipping vigorously and at a high level to express joy, or rolling softly on the floor using different body shapes to represent shells washed by the sea
  • rehearsing and presenting an appropriate dance to celebrate and appreciate diversity of cultures, based on research into dance tradition, in the school or at a local community event

Identify how the elements of dance and production elements express ideas in dance they make, perform and experience as audience, including exploration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dance (ACADAR008)

  • identifying meaning and describing purposes in dances from different social, cultural or historical contexts such as dances that include digital, visual or theatrical elements
  • comparing the expectations and requirements of performers and audience in different cultural settings
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – Do you recognise new movements in the dance? Why do you think people from different cultures dance? Where are these dances performed? 
  • examining dances in their community and comparing them to other dances of different peoples, times and cultures

Years 5 and 6

Level description

In Years 5 and 6, learning in Dance builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to dance independently, and collaboratively with their classmates, teachers and communities.

Students extend their awareness of the body as they combine movements that use body parts and actions with those involving body zones and bases. They extend their understanding and use of space, time, dynamics and relationships including performing in groups of varying sizes. They extend their use of various combinations of fundamental movement skills and technical skills developing competence, body control and accuracy.

As they experience dance, students draw on dance from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the dance and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn about dance in and beyond their local community. Students explore Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dances and learn how movement communicates meaning.

As they make and respond to dance, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements of dance, including the use of space and energy in dances, and social and cultural contexts of dance. They evaluate the use of elements of dance in dances they view and perform.

Students extend the understanding of safe dance practice, identifying appropriate warm-up and cool down procedures, performing within their own body capabilities and working safely in groups. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as they engage with more diverse performances. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Perform dance using expressive skills to communicate a choreographer's ideas, including performing dances of cultural groups in the community (ACADAM011)

  • presenting dances, using costumes and/or props where appropriate to enhance different contexts, such as performing dances with representatives of the cultural group from the community

Explain how the elements of dance and production elements communicate meaning by comparing dances from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dance (ACADAR012)

  • identifying and discussing meanings and significance intended by the choreographer's use of movement, space and energy, referring to their knowledge of the context in which the dance was created, for example, an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander dance, a Chinese ribbon dance, or a Sumatran tambourine dance
  • discussing social and cultural influences to recognise the role of dance and dancers in societies, cultures, environments and times, for example, conventions of a Kecak dance from Bali, or the protocols for performing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dance, including when it is not able to be viewed
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What are the traditions, customs and conventions of this dance? What different performance spaces are used for dances and why?
  • accessing real or virtual performances that are representative of different times and places and comparing how elements of dance and production elements communicate meaning in each

Years 7 and 8

Level description

In Years 7 and 8, learning in Dance builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to dance independently, and with their classmates, teachers and communities. They explore dance as an art form through choreography, performance and appreciation.

Students build on their awareness of the body through body part articulation. They extend their understanding and use of space, time, dynamics and relationships including performing in groups, spatial relationships and using interaction to communicate their choreographic intention. They extend the combinations of fundamental movement skills to explore dance styles. They extend technical skills from the previous band increasing their confidence, accuracy, clarity of movement and projection.

As they experience dance, students draw on dances from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the dance and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of the Asia region. Students learn about style and choreographic intent in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dances, and how these dances communicate social contexts and relationships. Students learn about sustainability through The Arts and sustainability of practices in The Arts.

As they make and respond to dance, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements, and social, cultural and historical contexts of dance. They evaluate choreographers' intentions and expressive skills in dances they view and perform.

Students understand that safe dance practices underlie all experiences in the study of dance. They perform within their own body capabilities and work safely in groups. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Combine elements of dance and improvise by making literal movements into abstract movements (ACADAM013)

  • analysing dances from a range of times and locations, and considering how a single realistic movement can be manipulated from representational to symbolic

Rehearse and perform focusing on expressive skills appropriate to style and/or choreographic intent (ACADAM017)

  • identifying and demonstrating distinct stylistic characteristics of dance, for example, body posture and attitude within various styles such as contemporary, musical theatre and hip hop (including Asian examples)
  • experimenting with representing social relationships through cultural dance

Identify and connect specific features and purposes of dance from contemporary and past times to explore viewpoints and enrich their dance-making, starting with dance in Australia and including dance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADAR019)

  • Considering viewpoints – cultures: For example – What is the cultural context in which this dance was developed, or in which it is viewed, and what does it signify? What are the stylistic differences in hip hop performances from different countries including Asia, Europe and the USA?
  • comparing dance styles in different artistic, social, environmental, historical and cultural contexts
  • Considering viewpoints – societies: For example – How does this dance relate to its social context and that of its audience? What are the protocols for viewing and performing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dances?
  • observing and identifying stylistic similarities and differences in both traditional and contemporary dances, for example, dances from Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people and Asian communities
  • investigating the development of dance styles and the influence of histories, societies, cultures and environments
  • investigating the role of dance in transmitting cultural information, such as advocating change in relation to contemporary issues (for example, land degradation)
  • Considering viewpoints – histories: For example – What historical forces and influences are evident in the dance work? How do the costumes and movements in this dance reflect the era in which it was created? 
  • recognising ethical issues including acknowledging sources and respecting the intellectual property rights of others in dance 

Years 9 and 10

Level description

In Years 9 and 10, learning in Dance builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to dance, independently, and in small groups, and with their teachers and communities. They explore dance as an art form through choreography, performance and appreciation.

Students build on their awareness of the body and how it is used in particular dance styles. They extend their understanding and use space, time, dynamics and relationships to expand their choreographic intentions. They extend the combinations of fundamental movement skills to include dance style-specific movement skills. They extend technical skills from the previous band increasing their confidence, accuracy, clarity of movement and projection.

As they experience dance, students draw on dances from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the dance and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students reflect on the development of traditional and contemporary styles of dance and how choreographers can be identified through the style of their choreography. Students learn about sustainability through The Arts and sustainability of practices in The Arts.

As they make and respond to dance, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social, cultural and historical contexts of dance. They evaluate dancers' success in expressing the choreographers' intentions and the use of expressive skills in dances they view and perform.

Students understand that safe dance practices underlie all experiences in the study of dance. They perform within their own body capabilities and work safely in groups

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Improvise to find new movement possibilities and explore personal style by combining elements of dance (ACADAM020)

  • extending their movement vocabulary to explore their own stylistic preferences and personal identity, for example, using analysis of dance styles from a range of cultures and times to inform their choreographic practice
  • investigating the use of elements of dance in works of artists, including those from the Asia region, and adapting dance ideas to create movements that represent a synthesis of influences

Practise and refine technical skills to develop proficiency in genre- and style-specific techniques (ACADAM022)

  • practising techniques used to perform increasingly complex dances of different genres and styles
  • identifying and analysing dance styles and traditions and applying knowledge of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system to execute movements safely and prevent injury to themselves and others

Perform dances using genre- and style-specific techniques and expressive skills to communicate a choreographer's intent (ACADAM024)

  • Considering viewpoints – cultures: For example – What culturally symbolic movements are evident in this dance?
  • identifying and refining expressive skills in performance, and selecting appropriate expressive skills to sensitively connect with varying social and cultural contexts and audiences
  • Considering viewpoints – societies: For example – How does the dance relate to the social context in which it was created?

Analyse a range of dance from contemporary and past times to explore differing viewpoints and enrich their dance making, starting with dance from Australia and including dance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and consider dance in international contexts (ACADAR026)

  • investigating the influence of Australian dance artists, companies and practices, including Australians who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and those of Asian heritage
  • considering how global trends in dance influence the development of dance in Australia
  • investigating the practices and traditions in dance and how people are influenced by their histories, societies, cultures and environments
  • exploring dance from different viewpoints, for example, analysing philosophies and ideologies that inform dance making in various societies and cultures

Drama

Foundation to Year 2

Level description

In Foundation to Year 2, students explore drama. They learn about how drama can represent the world and that they can make drama to represent their ideas about the world. They share their drama with peers and experience drama as audiences.

In Foundation to Year 2, learning in Drama builds on the Early Years Learning Framework. Students are engaged through purposeful play in structured activities, fostering a strong sense of wellbeing and developing students' connection with and contribution to the world.

Students become aware of role and situation as they listen and respond as fictional characters. They explore voice and movement to create role. They learn about focus and identifying the main idea of the drama. As audiences they recognise that the purpose of drama is to share it with others.

In the Foundation Year, students undertake drama suitable to their level of development.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the drama and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of the Asia region. While drama in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in drama from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students will learn that drama is used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for different purposes.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social and cultural contexts of drama. They make simple evaluations of drama expressing what they like and why.

Students learn about safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors. They experience the role of artist and they respond to feedback in their drama making. As an audience they learn to focus their attention on the performance and to respond at the end of the performance. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Present drama that communicates ideas, including stories from their community, to an audience (ACADRM029)

  • presenting scenes in which they apply story structures to set the scene, link action and create an ending, such as a cultural or community story with the assistance of representatives from the community

Respond to drama and consider where and why people make drama, starting with Australian drama including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADRR030)

  • identifying where they might see and hear drama in their lives and community, for example, sharing experiences of attending drama performances or taking part in drama in their community, and considering how drama sustains and communicates cultural knowledge
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – Why are these people making drama? Where are they making drama?

Years 3 and 4

Level description

In Years 3 and 4, learning in Drama builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to drama independently and collaboratively with their classmates and teachers.

Students extend their understanding of role and situation as they offer, accept and extend their ideas in improvisation. They vary voice and movement to create role when devising drama. They learn about focus, tension, space and time in their own and others' drama. They use language and ideas to shape dramatic action. They use story structures to shape drama for audiences.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the drama and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of the Asia region. Students learn about drama in their community. They also learn about drama from more distant locations that may be represented in their community. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama uses dramatic action and narrative structure to communicate ideas.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements including voice, movement, situation, time and place, and tension. They explore social and cultural contexts of drama. They make personal evaluations of their own and others' drama.

Students maintain safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors. Their understanding of the role of the artist and of the audience builds upon their experience from the previous band. As an audience, students focus their attention on the performance and respond to the performance. They consider why and how audiences respond to performance. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Use voice, body, movement and language to sustain role and relationships and create dramatic action with a sense of time and place (ACADRM032)

  • experimenting with body language and gesture from different cultures and times

Shape and perform dramatic action using narrative structures and tension in devised and scripted drama, including exploration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama (ACADRM033)

  • exploring dramatic traditions and practices from one or more Asian societies in their drama

Identify intended purposes and meaning of drama, starting with Australian drama, including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, using the elements of drama to make comparisons (ACADRR034)

  • identifying meaning and describing purposes in drama from different social, cultural or historical contexts
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What features and ideas in the drama come from other cultures, times and places? How have you used these ideas and features in your own drama? Why do you think people from all different cultures make and respond to drama?
  • comparing the expectations and requirements of performers and audience in different cultural settings and applying learning in their own performances
  • examining drama in their community and comparing it to other drama of different people, times and cultures
  • Considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – What are the stories and the ideas in the drama you watch and listen to? Which of the characters do you identify with? What relationships and situations do you recognise (or not recognise) in the drama you watch and listen to?

Years 5 and 6

Level description

In Years 5 and 6, learning in Drama builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to devised and scripted drama independently, and collaboratively with their classmates, teachers and communities.

Students develop character through voice and movement and extend their understanding and use of situation, focus, tension, space and time. They explore language and ideas to create dramatic action and consider mood and atmosphere in performance. They use conventions of story and other devices such as dramatic symbol to communicate meaning and shape and sustain drama for audiences.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the drama and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn about drama in and beyond their local community. Students explore how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama develops narrative, drives dramatic tension and uses performance styles and symbolism to communicate ideas.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements including voice, movement, situation, space and time, and tension. They explore the social, cultural and historical contexts of drama. They evaluate the use of elements of drama in drama they view and perform.

Students maintain safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse performances. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore dramatic action, empathy and space in improvisations, play building and scripted drama to develop characters and situations (ACADRM035)

  • comparing different ways improvisation and scripted drama create characters and action, and evaluating drama from other cultures and considering how they can use specific techniques in their own work

Rehearse and perform devised and scripted drama that develops narrative, drives dramatic tension, and uses dramatic symbol, performance styles and design elements to share community and cultural stories and engage an audience (ACADRM037)

  • exploring and applying different performance styles, and drawing on drama from other locations, cultures and times as sources of ideas in their own drama, and considering any protocols for representing community or cultural stories in performance

Explain how the elements of drama and production elements communicate meaning by comparing drama from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama (ACADRR038)

  • talking and writing about drama from other places and times and how it might or does contribute to their own drama, and how cultural understandings shape meanings in drama
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What are the traditions, customs and conventions of this drama? How does this drama draw from other cultures, times and places? How have you used drama of other times, places and cultures in your own drama?
  • identifying the features of drama from other contexts, including investigating traditional and contemporary drama from Asia

Years 7 and 8

Level description

In Years 7 and 8, learning in Drama builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to drama independently, and with their classmates, teachers and communities. They explore drama as an art form.

Students build on their understanding of role, character and relationships. They use voice and movement to sustain character and situation. They use focus, tension, space and time to enhance drama. They incorporate language and ideas and use devices such as dramatic symbol to create dramatic action and extend mood and atmosphere in performance. They shape drama for audiences using narrative and non-narrative dramatic forms and production elements.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the drama and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have converted oral records to other technologies. As they explore drama forms, students learn that over time there has been further development of different traditional and contemporary styles of drama, including contemporary styles developed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dramatists.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements including voice, movement, situation, space and time, and tension. They consider social, cultural and historical influences of drama. They evaluate the directors' intentions and expressive skills used by actors in drama they view and perform.

Students maintain safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse performances. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Develop and refine expressive skills in voice and movement to communicate ideas and dramatic action in different performance styles and conventions, including contemporary Australian drama styles developed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dramatists (ACADRM043)

  • developing use of performance techniques and conventions relevant to selected performance styles, for example, refining use of the body to communicate through movement and stillness, and through realistic and non-realistic movement; and exploring ways to transition between scenes
  • adapting facial expression, posture, gesture, movement and voice (including accent) to portray age, power and disposition in a specific performance style, such as contemporary Australian styles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dramatist

Identify and connect specific features and purposes of drama from contemporary and past times to explore viewpoints and enrich their drama making, starting with drama in Australia and including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADRR046)

  • identifying the social, historical and cultural contexts of the forms and styles represented in their drama
  • locating and exploring specific examples of contemporary Australian, Asian and other world drama
  • describing the role of drama in different cultures and using this information when they plan their own drama
  • Considering viewpoints – contexts: For example – What is the cultural context in which the drama was developed, or in which it is viewed, and what does it signify? How does this drama relate to its social context and that of its makers and audiences? What are the appropriate protocols for viewing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama and other culturally specific performance? What historical forces and influences are evident in the drama? How does this style of drama vary from those seen in other traditions and other parts of the world?

Years 9 and 10

Level description

In Years 9 and 10, learning in Drama builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to drama independently and in small groups, and with their teachers and communities. They explore drama as an art form through improvisation, scripted drama, rehearsal and performance.

Students refine and extend their understanding and use of role, character, relationships and situation. They extend the use of voice and movement to sustain belief in character. They maintain focus and manipulate space and time, language, ideas and dramatic action. They experiment with mood and atmosphere, use devices such as contrast, juxtaposition and dramatic symbol and modify production elements to suit different audiences.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the drama and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have converted oral records to other technologies.

As they explore drama forms, students learn that over time there has been further development of different traditional and contemporary styles of drama and that dramatists can be identified through the style of their work.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social, cultural and historical influences of drama. They evaluate actors' success in expressing the directors' intentions and the use of expressive skills in drama they view and perform.

Students maintain safety in drama and in interaction with other actors. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse performances. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Evaluate how the elements of drama, forms and performance styles in devised and scripted drama convey meaning and aesthetic effect (ACADRR052)

  • analysing how the elements of drama are manipulated to focus the dramatic action for audiences and using this information to refine drama they make
  • evaluating how the features and conventions of forms and styles create dramatic meaning and theatrical effect

Analyse a range of drama from contemporary and past times to explore differing viewpoints and enrich their drama making, starting with drama from Australia and including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and consider drama in international contexts (ACADRR053)

  • evaluating conventions from past forms and styles to consider incorporating into their own drama and contemporary practice
  • identifying and describing the actor–audience relationship in different dramatic contexts, forms and styles
  • linking conventions from different forms and styles with purposes, origins and contexts 

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