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Sample map: Australian Curriculum – The Arts: Media

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Foundation to Year 2

Level description

In Foundation to Year 2, students explore media arts. They learn how media artworks can represent the world and that they can make media artworks to represent their ideas about the world. They share their media artworks with peers and experience media artworks as audiences.

In Foundation to Year 2, learning in Media Arts builds on the Early Years Learning Framework. Students are engaged through purposeful play in structured activities, fostering a strong sense of wellbeing and developing students' connection with and contribution to the world.

Students become aware of structure, intent, character and settings as they explore ideas and construct stories. They learn about composition, sound and technologies. They learn about different audience groups and identify that they are an audience.

In the Foundation Year, students undertake media arts suitable to their level of development.

As they experience media arts, students draw on media arts from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the media arts and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. While media arts in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in media arts from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students will learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation of stories is presented in different ways through media arts.

As they make and respond to media artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social and cultural contexts of media arts. They make simple evaluations of media artworks expressing what they like and why.

Students learn about safety in using technologies and in interaction with others. They experience the role of artist and they respond to feedback in their media arts making. As an audience they learn to focus their attention on the media artwork and to respond at the end of the viewing. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore ideas, characters and settings in the community through stories in images, sounds and text (ACAMAM054)

  • exploring composition by selecting and editing images and/or sounds to create the characters in well-known stories or songs

Create and present media artworks that communicate ideas and stories to an audience (ACAMAM056)

  • capturing and sequencing images and text to create comic books that retell familiar and traditional stories to share with the class
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What images will I use to tell my traditional story?

Respond to media artworks and consider where and why people make media artworks, starting with media from Australia including media artworks of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMAR057)

  • identifying where they might experience media artworks in their lives and communities, for example, considering how media artworks sustain and communicate cultural knowledge
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What story is this media artwork telling? Who made this media artwork? Where is this media artwork from?

Years 3 and 4

Level description

In Years 3 and 4, learning in Media Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to media arts independently and collaboratively with their classmates and teachers.

Students extend their understanding of structure, intent, character and settings. They use composition, sound and technologies. They consider themselves as audiences and explore other audience groups. They explore institutions (individuals, communities and organisations) to understand purpose and process when producing media artworks.

As they make and respond to media artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, and forms and elements including structure, intent, character, settings, composition, time, space and sound. They explore social and cultural contexts of media arts. They make personal evaluations of their own and others' media artworks.

As they experience media arts, students draw on media arts from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the media arts and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn about media arts in their community. They also learn about media arts from more distant locations that may be represented in their community. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people represent themselves, their stories and locations through media arts in different ways.

Students maintain safety in using technologies and in interaction with others. They recognise appropriate and inappropriate use of other people's images and work in the making of media artworks. Their understanding of the role of the artist and of the audience builds upon their experience from the previous band. As an audience, students focus their attention on the media artwork and respond to the media artwork. They consider why and how audiences respond. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills 

Investigate and devise representations of people in their community, including themselves, through settings, ideas and story structure in images, sounds and text (ACAMAM058)

  • constructing realistic representations of the classroom or other community locations and then constructing fictional versions of the same space

Plan, create and present media artworks for specific purposes with awareness of responsible media practice (ACAMAM060)

  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What school event could I make an advertisement for?

Identify intended purposes and meanings of media artworks, using media arts key concepts, starting with media artworks in Australia including media artworks of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMAR061)

  • identifying meaning and describing representations in media artworks from different social, cultural or historical contexts, for example, different ways traditional stories are retold using media technologies
  • considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – What is similar or different to my school/home in a television representation of school/home?
  • examining media artworks in their community and comparing these to other media artworks commemorating different people, times and cultures

Years 5 and 6

Level description

In Years 5 and 6, learning in Media Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to media arts independently and collaboratively with their classmates, teachers and communities.

Students develop their use of structure, intent, character and settings by incorporating points of view and genre conventions in their compositions. They explore and use time, space, sound, movement, lighting and technologies. They identify the variety of audiences for which media artworks are made. They explain the purpose and processes for producing media artworks.

As they experience media arts, students draw on media arts from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the media arts and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn about media arts in and beyond their local community. Students explore how representation, characteristics and points of view of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples can be presented in media artworks.

As they make and respond to media artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, and forms and elements including structure, intent, character and settings. They explore the social, cultural and historical contexts of media arts. They evaluate the use of elements of media in media artworks they view and present.

Students maintain safety in use of technologies and in interaction with others, including the use of images and works of others. They consider the ethical behaviour and role of communities and organisations in regulating access to media artworks. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse media artworks.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore representations, characterisations and points of view of people in their community, including themselves, using settings, ideas, story principles and genre conventions in images, sounds and text (ACAMAM062)

  • exploring different power relationships and showing different perspectives on character by framing images, for example, representing a relationship from their school or community

Plan, produce and present media artworks for specific audiences and purposes using responsible media practice (ACAMAM064)

  • considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – What cultural images can or cannot be used when making and publishing my artwork?

Explain how the elements of media arts and story principles communicate meaning by comparing media artworks from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander media artworks (ACAMAR065)

  • discussing the role of media artworks in sharing cultural information about a group of people and their spirituality and enhancing the value placed on people and environment
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – How are values demonstrated in this media representation? Can we judge a culture from popular media images?
  • describing protocols about acceptable and unacceptable use of borrowed material in making and publishing media artworks
  • discussing issues around safety and sensitivity in relation to acceptable and unacceptable use and/or reference to personal and cultural images, sounds and texts when making and publishing media artworks

Years 7 and 8

Level description

In Years 7 and 8, learning in Media Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to media arts independently, and with their classmates, teachers and communities. They explore media arts as an art form.

Students build on their understanding of structure, intent, character, settings, points of view and genre conventions and explore media conventions in their media artworks. They build on their understanding and use of time, space, sound, movement, lighting and technologies. They examine the ways in which audiences make meaning and how different audiences engage with and share media artworks.

As they experience media arts, students draw on media arts from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the media arts and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of the Asia region. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have converted oral records to other technologies. Students explore social and cultural values and beliefs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as represented in media artworks and consider how these may influence the media artworks they make. As they explore media forms, students learn that over time there has been further development of different traditional and contemporary styles.

As they make and respond to media artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements including structure, intent, character, settings, points of view and genre conventions, and media conventions. They consider social, cultural and historical influences and representations in media arts. They evaluate how established behaviours or conventions influence media artworks they engage with and make.

Students maintain safety in use of technologies and in interaction with others, including the use of images and works of others. They develop ethical practices and consider regulatory issues when using technology. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse media artworks.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Develop media representations to show familiar or shared social and cultural values and beliefs, including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMAM067)

  • exploring media artworks that provide different ideas and concepts based on points of view and institutional practice, including viewing and experimenting with the depiction of cultural groups and social values in Australian film and television

Present media artworks for different community and institutional contexts with consideration of ethical and regulatory issues (ACAMAM070)

  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What features have been omitted or exaggerated in a stereotype? What are the differences between the private sector and the public sector television programming

Analyse how technical and symbolic elements are used in media artworks to create representations influenced by story, genre, values and points of view of particular audiences (ACAMAR071)

  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What features have been omitted or exaggerated in a stereotype? What are the differences between the private sector and the public sector television programming?
  • analysing a still image on the basis of photographic composition, image effects (digital and non-digital), and framing, and how they influence meaning, for example, images representing different cultural groups or ethnicities in Australian society, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

Identify specific features and purposes of media artworks from contemporary and past times to explore viewpoints and enrich their media arts making, starting with Australian media artworks including of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander media artworks (ACAMAR072)

  • comparing a media artwork (such as an animation) from a sole producer with one from an international organisation and commenting on differences in style
  • analysing the role of media artworks and media artists in transmitting cultural information and creating awareness of contemporary issues, such as water quality
  • considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – How are media artworks changed when viewed outside a cultural context? How effective is my image construction in terms of making meaning to me and to others? How can I undertake safe and ethical media practice in online spaces?

Years 9 and 10

Level description

In Years 9 and 10, learning in Media Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to media arts independently and in small groups, and with their teachers and communities. They explore media arts as an art form through representation, manipulation of genre and media conventions and analysis of media artworks.

Students refine and extend their understanding and use of structure, intent, character, settings, points of view, genre conventions and media conventions in their compositions. They extend the use of time, space, sound, movement and lighting as they use technologies. They analyse the way in which audiences make meaning and how audiences interact with and share media artworks.

As they experience media arts, students draw on media arts from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the media arts and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and from Asia. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have converted oral records to other technologies. As they explore media forms, students learn that over time there has been further development of different traditional and contemporary styles. They explore the representation of relationships that have developed between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and other cultures in Australia and how these may influence their own artistic intentions in making media artworks.

As they make and respond to media artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social, cultural and historical influences of media arts. They consider the local, global, social and cultural contexts that shape purpose and processes in production of media artworks. They evaluate the social and ethical implications of media arts.

Students maintain safety in use of technologies and in interaction with others, including the use of images and works of others. They maintain ethical practices and consider regulatory issues when using technology. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse media artworks.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Manipulate media representations to identify and examine social and cultural values and beliefs, including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMAM074)

  • exploring cultural, social and environmental issues represented in the media and re-imagining and remixing alternate versions to present a variety of viewpoints
  • exploring the communication of cultural and social values in Australian music videos, such as those by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, for consideration in their own work

Evaluate how technical and symbolic elements are manipulated in media artworks to create and challenge representations framed by media conventions, social beliefs and values for a range of audiences (ACAMAR078)

  • comparing the same idea, event or story presented in artworks in different media, explaining how different technical and symbolic elements are used to engage audiences and influence personal perceptions, for example, comparing two media artworks dealing with a current news event

Analyse a range of media artworks from contemporary and past times to explore differing viewpoints and enrich their media arts making, starting with Australian media artworks, including media artworks of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and international media artworks (ACAMAR079)

  • explore the role of media makers in challenging prevailing views on issues of contemporary relevance, for example, social and cultural issues presented in Australian film and television
  • identifying a variety of ways in which media can be produced, including through sole digital producers, cross-media organisations, public and private sector, and multinational organisations

Music

Foundation to Year 2

Level description

In Foundation to Year 2, students explore music. They listen to and explore sound and learn about how music can represent the world and that they can make music to represent their ideas about the world. They share their music with peers and experience music as audiences.

In Foundation to Year 2, learning in Music builds on the Early Years Learning Framework. Students are engaged through purposeful play in structured activities, fostering a strong sense of wellbeing and developing students' connection with and contribution to the world.

Students learn to listen to music and become aware of rhythm, pitch, dynamics and expression, form and structure, timbre and texture as they explore and make music. They learn to discriminate between sounds and silence, and loud and soft sounds. They learn to move and perform with beat and tempo. In the Foundation Year, students undertake music suitable to their level of development.

As they experience music, students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the music and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. While music in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in music from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students will learn that songs and music are used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for different purposes.

As they make and respond to music, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social and cultural contexts of music. They make simple evaluations of music expressing what they like and why.

Students learn about safety when using instruments and while interacting with others. They experience the role of artist and they respond to feedback in their music making. As an audience they learn to focus their attention on the performance and to respond at the end of the performance.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills 

Sing and play instruments to improvise, practise a repertoire of chants, songs and rhymes, including songs used by cultural groups in the community (ACAMUM081)

  • learning a song used by groups in the local community, such as Aboriginal songs or Torres Strait Islander songs from their community, respecting cultural protocols

Respond to music and consider where and why people make music, starting with Australian music, including music of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMUR083)

  • identifying where they might experience music in their lives and communities, for example, considering how music sustains and communicates cultural knowledge
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – Where is this music from and why was it made?
  • sharing constructive observations about music from a range of cultures as a performer and audience member
  • listening to and talking about music and musical instruments from different contexts and cultures 

Years 3 and 4

Level description

In Years 3 and 4, learning in Music builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to music independently and collaboratively with their classmates and teachers.

Students extend their understanding of the elements of music as they develop their aural skills. They match pitch and show the direction of a tune with gesture or drawings. They recognise difference between notes moving by step and by leap. They recognise and discriminate between rhythm and beat.

As they experience music, students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the music and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn about music in their community. They also learn about music from more distant locations that may be represented in their community. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music uses rhythm, pitch, dynamics and form to share stories.

As they make and respond to music, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms, and elements including rhythm, pitch, dynamics and expression, form and structure, timbre and texture. They explore social and cultural contexts of music. They make personal evaluations of their own and others' music.

Students maintain safety in using instruments and technologies and in interaction with others. Their understanding of the role of the artist and of the audience builds upon their experience from the previous band. As an audience, students focus their attention on the performance and respond to the music. They consider why and how audiences respond. 

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Practise singing, playing instruments and improvising music, using elements of music including rhythm, pitch, dynamics and for in a range of pieces, including in music from the local community (ACAMUM085)

  • practising singing and playing a range of music from different cultures, including various cultures within their local community
  • considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – Why was this music written?

Identify intended purposes and meanings as they listen to music using the elements of music to make comparisons, starting with Australian music, including music of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMUR087)

  • identifying meaning and describing purposes in music from different social, cultural or historical contexts
  • comparing the expectations and requirements of performers and audiences in different cultural settings
  • examining music in their community and comparing it to other music of different people, times and cultures

Years 5 and 6

Level description

In Years 5 and 6, learning in Music builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to music independently, and collaboratively with their classmates, teachers and communities.

Students develop their aural skills by identifying rhythm, pitch, dynamics and expression, form and structure, timbre and texture in music. They sing and play independent parts against contrasting parts and recognise instrumental, vocal and digitally generated sounds. They explore and use rhythm, pitch, dynamics and expression, form and structure, timbre and texture in music they perform and compose. They identify a variety of audiences for which music is made.

As they experience music, students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the music and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn how rhythm, pitch and form are used to communicate meaning. Students learn about music in and beyond their local community.

As they make and respond to music, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements of music. They explore the social, cultural and historical contexts of music. They evaluate the use of elements of music in music they listen to, perform and compose.

Students maintain safety in using instruments and technologies and in interaction with others. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse music.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore dynamics and expression, using aural skills to identify and perform rhythm and pitch patterns (ACAMUM088)

  • considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – How does the composer indicate dynamics in this piece? How does the performer show emotion in this piece?

Develop technical and expressive skills in singing and playing instruments with understanding of rhythm, pitch and form in a range of pieces, including in music from the community (ACAMUM089)

  • rehearsing and refining performances in an expressive manner to communicate meaning, for example, songs from the community

Explain how the elements of music communicate meaning by comparing music from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music (ACAMUR091)

  • discussing personal preferences for music from a range of contexts and cultures, using music terminology
  • participating in and responding to music from a variety of contexts and cultures as both audience members and performers
  • identifying and comparing how the elements of music are used and combined in different music styles from different cultures
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – How do different cultures use music? Why is this piece of music important in this culture?

Years 7 and 8

Level description

In Years 7 and 8, learning in Music builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to music independently, and with their classmates, teachers and communities. They explore music as an art form through listening, composing and performing.

Students build on their aural skills by identifying and manipulating rhythm, pitch, dynamics and expression, form and structure, timbre and texture in their listening, composing and performing. They aurally identify layers within a texture. They sing and play independent parts against contrasting parts. They recognise rhythmic, melodic and harmonic patterns and beat groupings. They understand their role within an ensemble and control tone and volume. They perform with expression and technical control. They identify a variety of audiences for which music is made.

As they experience music, students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the music and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have converted oral records to other technologies. As they explore form in music, students learn that over time there has been further development of techniques used in traditional and contemporary styles of music.

As they make and respond to music, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms, and elements including rhythm, pitch, dynamics and expression, form and structure, timbre and texture. They consider social, cultural and historical contexts of music. They evaluate the expressive techniques used in music they listen to and experience in performance.

Students maintain safety, correct posture and technique in using instruments and technologies. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse music.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Develop musical ideas, such as mood, by improvising, combining and manipulating the elements of music (ACAMUM093)

  • listening to and interpreting different types of score conventions from different styles and traditions to develop their own style

Practise and rehearse a variety of music, including Australian music to develop technical and expressive skills (ACAMUM094)

  • considering viewpoints – societies, cultures and histories: For example – What is the social context of this piece and for whom would it be performed? What is the cultural context of this piece and what does it signify? What instruments and other features of the music indicate it is from a particular time and place?

Structure compositions by combining and manipulating the elements of music using notation (ACAMUM095)

  • arranging a familiar piece into a different musical style by manipulating the elements of music

Perform and present a range of music, using techniques and expression appropriate to style (ACAMUM096)

  • using the features and performance practices to interpret a specific musical style

Analyse composers' use of the elements of music and stylistic features when listening to and interpreting music (ACAMUR097)

  • identifying and describing the features and performance practices that help determine a specific musical style or culture

Identify and connect specific features and purposes of music from different eras to explore viewpoints and enrich their music making, starting with Australian music including music of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAMUR098)

  • considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – How effectively did the musicians use expressive techniques in their performance? What are the strengths of this performance or composition?

Years 9 and 10

Level description

In Years 9 and 10, learning in Music builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to music independently and in small groups, and with their teachers and communities. They explore music as an art form through listening, composing and performing.

Students continue to develop their aural skills as they build on their understanding and use of the elements of music. They extend their understanding and use of more complex rhythms and diversity of pitch and incorporate dynamics and expression in different forms. They extend their use of and identification of timbre to discriminate between different instruments and different voice types.

They build on their understanding of their role within an ensemble as they control tone and volume in a range of styles using instrumental and vocal techniques. In performance they extend technical and expressive skills from the previous band.

As they experience music, students draw on music from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the music and influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have converted oral records to other technologies. As they explore music forms, students learn that over time there has been further development of different traditional and contemporary styles. Students reflect on the development of traditional and contemporary styles of music and how musicians can be identified through the style of their music.

As they make and respond to music, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social, cultural and historical contexts of music. They evaluate performers' success in expressing the composers' intentions and expressive skills in music they listen to and perform.

Students maintain safety, correct posture and technique in using instruments and technologies. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon previous bands as students engage with more diverse music.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Improvise and arrange music, using aural recognition of texture, dynamics and expression to manipulate the elements of music to explore personal style in composition and performance (ACAMUM099)

  • exploring use of elements of music in different music styles, including those from other cultures and times, as a stimulus for improvisation

Plan and organise compositions with an understanding of style and convention, including drawing upon Australian music by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists (ACAMUM102)

  • planning, recording and communicating ideas in different musical styles, including Australian music by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, using specialised notation and terminology

Perform music applying techniques and expression to interpret the composer's use of elements of music (ACAMUM103)

  • recognising the influence of social, cultural and historical developments and incorporating these into their performance

Evaluate a range of music and compositions to inform and refine their own compositions and performances (ACAMUR104)

  • analysing how the use and combination of the elements of music defines their developing personal style and how their style is influenced by cultural and historical styles
  • comparing music from different styles to identify and describe stylistic, cultural and historical practices and inform their own composition and performance practice
  • investigating why and how different traditions, styles and contexts affect the experience and interpretation of a piece of music and taking this into account when interpreting and composing music
  • considering viewpoints – societies: For example – How is this piece typical of the social context in which it was created? cultures: How are the elements of music used in this piece to convey a cultural identity? histories: What historical forces and influences are evident in this work?

Analyse a range of music from contemporary and past times to explore differing viewpoints and enrich their music making, starting with Australian music, including music of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and consider music in international contexts (ACAMUR105)

  • discussing the influence of music on the development of personal and cultural identity

Visual Arts

Foundation to Year 2

Level description

In Foundation to Year 2, students explore visual arts. They learn about how to make visual representations of their ideas, experiences, observations and imagination. They share their artworks with peers and experience visual arts as audiences.

In Foundation to Year 2, learning in Visual Arts builds on the Early Years Learning Framework. Students are engaged through purposeful play in structured activities, fostering a strong sense of wellbeing and developing students' connection with and contribution to the world.

Students become aware of how and why artists, craftspeople and designers present their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints. They learn how their ideas or subject matter can be developed through different forms, styles, techniques, materials and technologies. They enhance their perception skills by learning to notice visual detail as they examine and represent familiar and new objects and events in their lives. They explore how and why artworks are created and become familiar with using and applying visual conventions, such as line, shape, colour and texture. They develop and apply safe and sustainable practices when experimenting with different materials, techniques and technologies.

In the Foundation Year, students undertake visual arts suitable to their level of development.

As they experience visual arts, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of the Asia region. While visual arts in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in visual arts from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students will learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artworks represent particular ideas and stories.

As they make and respond to visual artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and styles through social and cultural contexts. They provide opinions about artworks expressing what they like and why. They experience the role of artist and audience and they respond to feedback in their visual arts making.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore ideas, experiences, observations and imagination to create visual artworks and design, including considering ideas in artworks by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists (ACAVAM106)

  • identifying and using visual conventionin their artworks after investigating different art, craft and design styles from other cultures and times, for example, Expressionism, Fauvism, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and Asia

Use and experiment with different materials, techniques, technologies and processes to make artworks (ACAVAM107)

  • using techniques to demonstrate various compositional effects, for example, overlapping or crosshatching

Create and display artworks to communicate ideas to an audience (ACAVAM108)

  • considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – What did this artwork or design make you think about and why? What figures/shapes can you see in the artwork? How has the artist treated the figures/shapes to convey their idea or meaning?

Respond to visual artworks and consider where and why people make visual artworks, starting with vosual artworks from Australia, including visual artworks of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAVAR109)

  • identifying where they might experience art in their lives and communities, for example, keeping a diary of 'art experiences' and combining to create a class list and then discussing how visual artworks sustain and communicate cultural knowledge
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – Where is this artwork from and why was it made? Who made the artworks? Where and how are they displayed?
  • identifying how design elements, such as line, shape, colour or texture, are used in their artworks and in the artwork of others
  • describing and interpreting representations in a selection of artworks, for example, considering the subject matter, styles and techniques of a selection of artworks, and how the artworks make them think and feel in response to the artists' intentions
  • acknowledging the role of the artist and audience as they start to interpret meaning in artworks

Years 3 and 4

Level description

In Years 3 and 4, learning in Visual Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to visual arts independently, and collaboratively with their classmates and teachers.

Students extend their awareness of how and why artists, craftspeople and designers realise their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints. They explore and experiment with a greater diversity of materials, techniques and technologies. They further enhance their perceptual skills by observing closely the visual detail of the world around them and applying these observations through different practical applications of art making. Through observational, imaginative, cognitive and sensory investigations, students become more knowledgeable and discerning about their practices as a visual artist. They can determine and execute an individual approach to a theme or subject matter. They explore, predict outcomes, test and explain their experimentation. They use different physical and digital materials and techniques, technologies and processes in visual arts forms, such as painting, drawing, sculpture, design and digital media.

As they experience visual arts, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of the Asia region. Students learn about visual arts in their community. They also learn about visual arts from more distant locations that may be represented in their community. Students also explore different styles of art made by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists.

As they make and respond to visual artworks as artists and audiences, students explore visual representations based on their investigations of past histories, their heritage, and significant events and celebrations within their community. They make connections between their own artistic intentions and those of other artists, observing and identifying ideas and symbols used and adapted by artists in their artworks.

Students learn about safe visual arts practices. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon their experience from the previous band.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore ideas and artworks from different cultures and times, including artwork by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists to use as inspiration for their own representations (ACAVAM110)

  • researching artworks of different styles and artists from different times and cultures to inspire their own representations in forms such as printmaking and drawing, and styles such as realistic or expressive
  • considering viewpoints – meaning and interpretations: For example – What is this painting telling us about the past? How does the artwork use visual conventions to convey meaning? How did the artist work within a space, and at this time? How and why did they innovate their practice?
  • exploring ways to represent their ideas using visual conventions from different historical, social or cultural contexts
  • experimenting with visual conventions to create particular visual effects in representations
  • identifying and explaining choices in art making, including forms, styles and visual conventions in their artworks, and influences of other artists on their artworks

Use materials, techniques and processes to explore visual conventions when making artworks (ACAVAM111)

  • selecting and experimenting with forms, styles, materials and technologies to explore symbolic use of visual conventions used by various cultures and times, for example, how colour and pattern are perceived as symbolic in different cultures
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What clues in the artwork tell you where it was made, who made it, and why? What artworks are you familiar with?> Which style of artworks represents your community?

Use materials, techniques and processes to explore visual conventions when making artworks (ACAVAM111)

  • experimenting with alternative styles of representation from different cultures and times in their artworks, for example, realistic, symbolic, narrative, abstract

Identify intended purposes and meanings of artworks using visual arts terminology to compare artworks, starting with visual artworks in Australia including visual artworks of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACAVAR113)

  • identifying meaning and describing subject matter and form in artworks from different social, cultural or historical contexts
  • considering viewpoints – societies, cultures and histories: For example – What clues in the artwork tell us where it was made, who made it, and why? What artworks are you familiar with? Which style of artwork represents your community? What are the people in the painting doing? Can you draw what you did on Australia Day?
  • comparing artworks made for different reasons, using appropriate visual conventions, and identifying possible differences in interpretations, for example, comparing contemporary representations of locations in their community with representations by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists
  • examining public art in their community and comparing it to other artwork commemorating different people, times and cultures
  • considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – Did you enjoy looking at the artwork? Why? Which artwork do you like the most? Explain why you like it. What artworks do you like to make, and why? Compare these buildings and their relationship with the environment, e.g. the Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre and the Temple of the Golden Pavilion, Kyoto

Years 5 and 6

Level description

In Years 5 and 6, learning in Visual Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to visual arts independently, and collaboratively with their classmates, teachers and communities.

Students extend their awareness of how and why artists, craftspeople and designers realise their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints. They develop conceptual and representational skills. They use and apply appropriate visual conventions. Students test and innovate with properties and qualities of available materials, techniques, technologies and processes. The focus for this experimentation is on combining two or more visual arts forms to test the boundaries of representation.

As they experience visual arts, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the influences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and those of the Asia region. Students explore the practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists to learn about how these artists communicate intention.
As they make and respond to visual artworks as artists and audiences, students explore a diversity of ideas, concepts and viewpoints. They draw ideas from other artists, artworks, symbol systems, and visual arts practices in other cultures, societies and times. Suggested topics for their inquiry could include examining how artists have explored the concept of 'environment' or 'sustainability' in different places and at different times.

Students extend their understanding of safe visual arts practices and choose to use sustainable materials, techniques and technologies. Their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds upon their experience from the previous band.

Content descriptions and Elaborations
Knowledge and Skills

Explore ideas and practices used by artists, including practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, to represent different views, beliefs and opinions (ACAVAM114)

  • exploring cross-media effects and characteristics of representation when making artworks inspired by observation or imagination, for example, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art from the local community, graffiti art, graphic design, or manga art

Develop and apply techniques and processes when making their artworks (ACAVAM115)

  • considering viewpoints – materials and technologies: What is the artwork made of? How does the choice of material enhance the audience's understanding of the artist's intention? What made you want to touch this sculpture?
  • making informed choices about using various combinations of representational elements appropriate for a concept, theme or subject matter, for example, combining realistic drawing skills with an appropriated image from the past to create new meaning
  • explaining influences of other artists on their own art making

Plan the display of artworks to enhance their meaning for an audience (ACAVAM116)

  • considering viewpoints – histories: For example – What did the artist want the audience to see and understand?
  • recognising and evaluating how culture, gender, age, time and place, among other factors, impact on how an audience reads an artwork, for example, comparing the response of different age groups
  • considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What clues in the artwork tell us where it was made, who made it, and why? What artworks are you familiar with? Which style of artwork represents your community? How would you represent your neighbourhood?
  • reflecting critically on how effectively their ideas or feelings have been expressed in their own artworks, and that of others

Explain how visual arts conventions communicate meaning by comparing artworks from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artworks (ACAVAR117)

  • considering viewpoints – critical theories: For example – Compare these paintings (one from India, one Australian). What do you recognise? What do you understand? What is new?
  • explaining the artistic vision of artists from different contexts, particularly referencing the meaning their artworks convey, for example, Aboriginal rock art, graffiti art, Egyptian art
  • considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – What is this artwork about? What visual conventions have been used to convey meaning? How did the artist represent their subject matter? How does the artwork reflect the artist's perspective about the environment? How did the audience react to the artwork when it was first displayed?
  • analysing how symbolic meaning or metaphor is constructed in their own artworks and artworks of others
  • expressing an opinion about the way numerous artists communicate multiple viewpoints through their artwork

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